How to Make Boxer Shorts

on August 11 | in Sewing Tutorials + Patterns | by | with 5 Comments

Gia from Fairytale Flowers and One Perfect Day creates and sells handmade flower accessories, bags, bracelets and more. Based in Athens, Greece, Gia blogs at OnePerfectDay; you can learn more about Gia in her introduction. She joined us with the Peony Fabric Flower and Easy Organza Flower Accessories tutorials earlier this year, and now she shows you how to make your own boxer shorts. You could make a full set of new, back-to-school boxers! These make great sleeping shorts for warmer weather too.


This shows you how to copy boxer shorts you already have by turning them into the pattern you will use to make lots more boxer shorts!

While the boxer shorts used in this tutorial are boys’ boxer shorts, you can use this guide for children’s or adult-sized boxer shorts alike.

First find some boxer shorts that fit well. This is what you want your end product to be like.

Choose the fabric you want your new boxers to be.

Gather your materials and tools.

Supplies:

  • Shorts you’re copying
  • Fabric of your choice for your new boxers
  • Thread of your choice
  • Elastic band, fairly wide
  • Scissors
  • Pins
  • Seam Ripper
  • Sewing machine

Unpick the sample boxer shorts and iron all pieces. This is your pattern! There are four pieces in this pattern. And the elastic waist-band.

I started with this. Measure the elastic band of the original shorts and cut yours the same length. Sew the ends together.

Iron them flat, as in the picture. Then put the elastic band away. You will need it again once your new boxer short pieces are all sewn up. It will be the last thing you sew.

Take your pattern pieces and pin them onto your fabric. Cut them out. The seat of the boxer shorts is as good a place to start as any.

Find the leg piece and the seat piece. Position them right sides facing.

Slowly work the edges together around the curve, pinning them together as you go. Stitch along the curve at about 3/4″. The whole boxer shorts pattern is finished with flat felled seams so you need enough seam allowance to turn the edges in twice.

Here’s how to do the flat felled seam:
- After sewing the first stitch, turn the edge over once.
- Pin it in place.

- Fold over once more and pin down.
- When it’s as neat as you like, sew it in place.

Then turn the pattern pieces over and top stitch them.

Now you have a flat felled seam with no unsightly edges in sight.

Follow the same steps to join the other leg/seat pattern pieces. Right sides facing, carefully align the two curves together and pin, stitch and flat fell seam them.

Time for the fly. Find the two corresponding pattern pieces.

Pin them together, right sides facing. Sew together along the curve only.

Turn inside out and iron.

Top stitch tracing around the curve and straight up towards the waistline.

Find the other fly piece.

(As I found out later this pattern was designed for fabric that has only good sides. It folds over the fabric and ends up using the wrong side of the fabric on the front of the fly. I was not worried about this as I think it gives the finished shorts added interest but if you don’t want the wrong side of your fabric to show on the finished boxers select your fabric carefully or consider cutting an extra pattern piece to sew on.)

Fold one edge over. Then turn the bottom edge over.

Pin down and stitch all around.

Time to sew the two fly pieces together. You need to position them one on top of the other.

The curved fly piece goes under the square fly piece.

I found this to be the trickiest part of the entire pattern because once you sew these two together you will flat fell seam the stitch that goes from the fly to the crotch. Take your time to position it just right.

Pin it together and stitch the two fly pieces together at the very top, at the waistband, and where the fly opening ends, following the curve of the hidden fly piece.

You should now have this. Continue by pinning together then stitching closed the pattern pieces from fly to crotch. Remember that this is also a flat fell seam so stitch them wrong sides facing. Fold this over twice and stitch it down.

Time to join the two leg pieces. Once again a flat fell seam so join them wrong sides facing and stitch, always making sure you are allowing 3/4″ to your seam. Fold over once, then twice. Pin it, then sew it. Topstitch it. To finish off the legs, just turn the edge over.

Then over again. Pin it down and stitch it.

The waist band is the very last thing to tackle. Fold over about as much fabric as your elastic is wide. We don’t finish edges here as the elastic will come and cover it all.

Find the elastic band that you have prepared and attach it to the back of your boxer shorts’ waistband with the edges of the elastic positioned over the folded-down waistband.

Then you need to pin your elastic to a few points on your waistband so that you can sew it on more easily. Make this as neat and precise as you can so that the finished elasticated waistband looks nice and neat.

I divided both my elastic band and boxers’ waistband into four quarters and pinned the corresponding points together. Sew the elastic band onto the boxer shorts by pulling the elastic straight over the fabric and feeding it into the machine as carefully as you need to. This is neither difficult nor fussy, you just need to be careful doing it.

Then do the exact same thing for the bottom of the elastic. This is what you’ll get when you sew the elastic on.

Your boxer shorts are ready!

Try them out!

Pin It

Related Posts

5 Responses to How to Make Boxer Shorts

  1. Gia says:

    Thank you Samantha for pointing that out!
    My sewing terminology is not quite up to scratch….(And I was quite proud of myself for knowing that…..)
    Now I know it’s a flat felled seam.

  2. Wende says:

    these boxers are just too cute. Now I just wish I had a pair to copy….hahaha

  3. Elnora says:

    Thanks so much for this excellent tutorial! I love wearing boxers around the house during hot weather, but I like them long and with at least somewhat feminine fabric, which is hard to find. Now I can make my own. Big thumbs up! Thanks!

  4. Merrilee says:

    supercute! love the red and white stripe fabric too

  5. Samantha says:

    You are actually making a flat felled seam, not a princess seam.

« »

Subscribe to the sewmamasew.com newsletter

Sewing inspiration, projects, events and offers delivered conveniently to your email.

SUBSCRIBE +

Get the latest sewmamasew.com news via